lush-3d-machine-jooz

The Lush The Machine 3D returns…

Lush Longboards’ most popular freeride deck of 2016 is back, with a new construction just in time for spring!

Our most popular freeride/slide/DH deck is back! Following feedback from various team riders, we decided that the original needed even more stiffness and toughness, so we’re now pressing this awesome deck using our X-Tuff construction.

A composite of Canadian hardrock maple and diagonally opposed bi-axial fibreglass, X-Tuff allows us to make the deck one ply thinner whilst adding stiffness and strength. All laminates are soaked in epoxy prior to pressing, making the deck unbelievably strong and tough. Diagonal fibreglass weave keeps torsional twist to a minimum – perfect for holding out those slides a little longer. Thanks to this glass, maple and epoxy combo, the deck holds it’s pop for far longer than before, making those high-speed ollies and flips more attainable than ever.

The team were super stoked with the shape and dimensions from the previous version, so we decided to leave it the same as previous versions. A simple, no frills bomber shape with “the best kicktail in the longboard business,” pressed into our 3D rocker concave creates some deep pockets for your feet and a whole load of grip to stop you sliding off mid-slide. If it ain’t broke – don’t fix it!

Air a ramp, ollie some stairs, dodge some traffic and bomb a hill all in one day – this board will take pretty much any kind of skateboarding you want and come out the other side hungry for more. Decks like this are what results from years of rider input combined with solid materials and proven manufacturing techniques. The Machine 3D X-Tuff is even more awesome than before – get on it!

Length 38.5” /97.7cm
Width 10” 25 / 4cm
Wheelbase 25.3” / 64cm – 24.54” / 62cm
Tail 6.45” / 164mm – 6.82” / 173mm
Construction 7ply 100% Canadian Maple with X-Tuff Composite
Profile 3d Rocker with a kick tail
FlexStiff

X-Tuff Composite
When we designed X-Tuff, we had two goals in mind:

  • Minimise torsional flex – better tracking in sweepers, more predictable slides, and increased straight-line stability
  • Extra stiffness lengthways, but with just enough flex to absorb bumps and keep a smooth ride. Controlled, directional flex is key.

Goal #1 – Minimise Torsional Flex.

On the right you can see what we mean by torsional flex in a longboard. As you turn side to side, your toes and heels “twist” the board along it’s length. Whilst this can be desirable in a cruiser deck, in a speedboard it gives sloppy cornering and unpredictable sliding. Not cool!!

You can see that the lines of force run diagonally across the deck, from shoulder to shoulder, or heel to toe.

With X-Tuff, the uppermost layer of glass in the deck runs diagonally,so that the fibres act to prevent the deck twisting as you corner and lean.

Goal #2 – Controlled, directional flex

However, we don’t just want torsional stiffness, we also want a degree of lengthways stiffening too, as speedboards need to be stiff to a predictable ride. In short, we need to control the flex according to it’s directionwithin the deck – we want zero twist, but a tiny bit of give along the length to absorb any bumps and shocks.

To do this, we’ve kept the bottom layer with the fibres running along the length of the deck to give us extra stiffness lengthways, and we’re using the top diagonal layer to minimise torsional flex.

So what this means is – you get your torsional stiffness from the top layer of Fibreglass, and your lengthways stiffness from the bottom layer of Fibreglass.

We’re using the same Outer Maple Veneers as X-Flex to damp things down and give a controlled ride with minimal bounce. We generally use a thicker Wood Core for X-Tuff, matching thickness with wheelbase to maintain the balance between high stiffness and light weight.

X-Tuff is proven in te toughest race and freeride conditions all over the globe. Our riders can attest that it is one of the strongest and most effective speedboard constructions available, anywhere.

Find the Lush Machine 3D here.

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